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What DPS’ Pay Proposal Would Mean for Teachers | Denver Public Schools
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What DPS’ Pay Proposal Would Mean for Teachers

Great teachers make a difference in the lives of Denver’s kids and the future of our community. So compensating them for the work they do every day in our classrooms is an important issue for all of us.

The examples below are intended to show how the district’s most recent pay proposal would affect our educators at different stages throughout their teaching careers.

These numbers are likely to change, as the district and the teachers union, the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, continue negotiations. However, they provide a picture of what the district is offering. These figures were updated Jan. 11, 2019.

Note: Any comparisons with other districts in these examples assume those districts will increase their teacher pay by 3% for the coming 2019-20 school year. 

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Example: New DPS Teacher $45,500+

New to teaching: $45,500 

A teacher with a bachelor’s degree and no prior teaching experience who does not earn any incentives, such as serving in a high-poverty school, would earn $45,500 under the district’s new pay proposal. On the DPS calendar, teachers work 187 days per year.

This starting salary would be the second-highest in the metro area, behind only Boulder Valley schools.

Typical for DPS: $51,500

Based on current data, two-thirds of teachers new to DPS have previous classroom experience and 72% will earn at least one $2,500 incentive. So a typical “new” DPS teacher is likely to earn more than the $45,500 starting salary.

For example, a teacher with a bachelor’s degree, two years of experience and earning a $2,500 incentive for serving in a high-poverty school would earn $51,500.

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn at least two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.

Example: DPS Teacher with 5 Years of Experience $54,250+

Base salary: $54,250-$57,750

A teacher with a bachelor’s degree and five years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $54,250 under the district’s pay proposal.

A teacher with a master’s degree and five years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $57,750. Note: More than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree.

Typical for DPS: $56,750-$60,250

Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive. A teacher with a bachelor’s degree, five years of experience with positive evaluations and earning a $2,500 incentive for serving in a high-poverty school or a hard-to-fill position such as math or science would earn $56,750.

This is the highest salary at this education and experience level in the metro area.

The same teacher with a master’s degree would earn $60,250. Note: More than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree.

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.

Example: DPS Teacher with 10 Years of Experience $62,750+

Base salary: $62,750

A DPS teacher with a bachelor’s degree and 10 years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $62,750. This would grow by $3,500 to $66,250 if all 10 years’ experience are in DPS.

Typical for DPS: $65,250-$69,000

Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive. So a teacher with a bachelor’s degree, 10 years of experience with positive reviews and a $2,500 incentive for serving in a high-poverty school or a hard-to-fill position would earn $65,250. This would grow by $3,500 to $68,750 if all 10 years’ experience are in DPS.

The $65,250 salary is higher than the salary for a teacher with comparable experience and education in Jefferson County or Aurora and slightly behind Cherry Creek ($65,684). However, in Cherry Creek, the teacher would be capped at this salary without further education while Denver has no salary caps. Note: In DPS, 39% of teachers have a bachelor’s degree.

A DPS teacher with a master’s degree, 10 years of experience with positive reviews and a $2,500 incentive would earn $69,000. This would grow by $3,500 to $72,500 if all 10 years’ experience are in DPS. Note: More than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree.

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn at least two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.

Example: DPS Teacher with 15 Years of Experience $69,750+

Base salary: $68,250

A DPS teacher with a bachelor’s degree and 15 years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $68,250. This would grow by $3,500 to $71,750 if 10 of the 15 years’ experience are in DPS.

Typical for DPS: $75,500

Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive. In addition, more than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree. A teacher with a master’s degree, 15 years of experience with positive evaluations and earning at least one $2,500 incentive for serving in a high-poverty school or hard-to-fill position would earn $75,500.

If 10 of the 15 years are served consecutively in DPS, the teacher would earn another $3,500 for a salary of $79,000.

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn at least two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.

Example: DPS Teacher with 20 Years of Experience $70,750+

Base salary: $70,750

A teacher with a bachelor’s degree and 20 years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $72,750. This would grow $3,500 to $76,250 if 10 of those 20 years are in consecutive service to DPS kids.

Typical for DPS: $78,000

Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers will earn at least one $2,500 incentive. In addition, more than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree. A teacher with a master’s degree, 20 years of experience with positive evaluations and earning at least one $2,500 incentive would earn $78,000.

The salary would grow another $3,500 to $81,500 if 10 of the 20 years’ experience are in consecutive service to DPS kids. 

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn at least two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.

Example: DPS Teacher with 25 Years of Experience $73,250+

Base salary: $73,250

A teacher with a bachelor’s degree and 25 years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $73,250. This would grow $3,500 to $76,750 if 10 of those 25 years are in consecutive service to DPS kids.

Typical for DPS: $80,500

Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive. In addition, more than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree. A teacher with a master’s degree, 25 years of experience with positive evaluations and earning at least one $2,500 incentive for serving in a high-poverty school or hard-to-fill position would earn $81,250.

The salary would grow another $3,500 to $84,000 if 10 of the 20 years of experience are in consecutive service to DPS kids.

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn at least two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.

Example: DPS Teacher with 30 Years of Experience $75,250+

Base salary: $75,250

A teacher with a bachelor’s degree and 30 years of experience with positive evaluations who does not earn any incentives would earn $75,250. This would grow $3,500 to $78,750 if 10 of those 30 years were in consecutive service to DPS kids.

Typical for DPS: $82,250

Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive. In addition, more than half of DPS teachers have a master’s degree. A teacher with a master’s degree, 30 years of experience with positive evaluations and earning at least one $2,500 incentive for serving in a high-poverty school or hard-to-fill position would earn $82,250.

The salary would grow another $3,500 to $85,750 if 10 of the 30 years of experience are in consecutive service to DPS kids.

Additional pay opportunities

Teachers in DPS have various opportunities to earn additional pay and this would continue under the district’s pay proposal.

Annual incentives for serving in high-poverty schools and hard-to-fill positions: Add $2,500-$5,000

  • Based on current data, 72% of DPS teachers would earn at least one $2,500 incentive, as reflected in the “typical for DPS” example above. And 37% of DPS teachers would earn at least two $2,500 incentives or $5,000.

Annual incentives for participating in the district’s teacher leadership program: Add $800 to $5,000

  • Currently in DPS, 1 in 5 teachers participate in the teacher leadership program, where they coach and collaborate with other teachers in their schools. Incentives range from $800 for new teacher ambassadors up to $5,000 for senior team leads. Most participants earn at least $1,500.

Annual incentive for serving in highest-priority schools: Add $2,500

  • Under the proposed pay plan, 30 DPS schools would be defined as “highest-priority” schools because of the significant challenges they face. Educators who teach in these schools and return to teach the next year would receive an additional $2,500 bonus in the fall. This reflects the district’s belief in attracting and keeping strong teachers in our most challenging schools.

Salary increase for advanced education, credentials and service in DPS: Add $3,500-$17,500

  • The district’s pay proposal creates five ways a DPS teacher can add another $3,500 to their annual salary: earn a master’s degree, earn a master’s degree plus 30 college credits, earn an advanced license, earn National Board teaching certification or serve 10 consecutive years in DPS classrooms. Currently, two-thirds of Denver teachers have achieved at least one of these milestones.